William Golding – any reminiscences?

Dear Members,

Jeff Wilkinson, archivist at the school, has requested that this be passed on:

I know that this is a long-shot but I am aware that we have Old Maidstonians who lived at this time and have good memories, so please can you help? I am trying to find any OM who has memories of William Golding, author of ‘Lord of the Flies’, when he taught at the school between 1938 and 1940, or perhaps when he joined the Navy for war-time service. My reason for asking is that Kent Life are intending publishing an article about him next year as a celebration of the time he spent at MGS and I am sure that individual memories would highlight the item.

If any relation of yours was at MGS at that time but does not have internet access, then perhaps you could ask them on my behalf.

Please reply to jeffrey.wilkinson@mgs-kent.org.uk

Thanking you in anticipation,

Jeff Wilkinson, Archivist

Norman Butcher (1939-46)

From Colin Butcher (colinandrewbutcher@gmail.com)

Norman Edward Butcher of Edinburgh passed away peacefully on Sunday 23rd April at the Western General Hospital.

Born in Chichester 1928, educated at Maidstone, Sheffield and Oxford (Queen’s College).

Taught at Reading University and at the Open University in Scotland from its inception.

Geologist, educator and historian.

Funeral service at Warriston Crematorium, Edinburgh, EH7 4HW, on Friday 5th May at 15.30.

David Sayer (OM 1946-55)

We regret to announce the death of David Sayer on 24th January.
The service will take place at Holy Cross Church, Bearsted, at 1pm on Wednesday 22nd February, and will be followed by private cremation. His wife said “I had indeed initially intended the funeral to be a small family affair, but this is definitely not going to happen”.

The following obituary has been provided by the OMS chairman

David Michael Sayer

David was born in Romford, Essex on 19 September 1936 but was educated in Kent, at Maidstone Grammar School (1946 to 1955), and was passionate about cricket from a very young age. He gained an open Exhibition to Brasenose College Oxford in 1955 but did not go “up” to read for his MA in History until 1957 as two years National Service got in the way. At school he was Captain of the Cricket first XI and he played first XV Rugby. He was House Captain of Corpus Christi in his last year at MGS when Corpus achieved its last “Cock House Cup” of a long winning streak. He played cricket on concrete and matting wickets in Germany whilst serving her Majesty and played for Oxford University from 1958 to 1960. David also played at that time for the Gentlemen v Players and toured New Zealand with MCC in 1960/61. In that year he became a full time professional with Kent having played occasional games for the County from his sixth form days and through each of his Oxford years after the varsity fixtures were over. He also played for the Mote Cricket Club in the late 50’s and was Captain of the Club for eight seasons in the 1970’s having retired from full time County Cricket in 1968. He still played in occasional matches for the County alongside the likes of Knott and Underwood in the “Glory Days”. His final game for Kent was in 1976, against Glamorgan in the John Player league. As a fast bowler his career average was 23.6 and he took five wickets in an innings 19 times. His career best was achieved in his third game for the Club: 7 for 37 in a match against Leicestershire at Grace Road in 1958. In that game his match figures were 10 for 67. An anecdote related to me by a former Mote player has it that when the Mote played against MGS in the summer of 1953, David was the fastest bowler he had ever faced and he was bruised through his pads! Cricket was in David’s blood: when he lived in Sandling Lane as a young teenager he played on Penenden Heath at every available opportunity.

After his playing career David ran his own insurance agency in Lenham until his retirement. He was a loyal Kent County Cricket Club supporter after his playing days and acted as their insurance broker. He played golf at Bearsted. In later life his joints creaked somewhat – the penalty of fast bowling over so many years taking its toll on his tall angular frame: he used to joke with me latterly about “bowling off a short run today”. He bore ill health with fortitude – his eyesight suffered too latterly – If I said to him that he wouldn’t see the stumps he’d reply “Did that ever matter?” That was typical of his dry humour even in adversity. David was a regular attender at the OM Supper and would always have a pithy and apt comment to make about any situation. He leaves a widow Carol and two daughters Alexandria and Vivienne and their families. His elder brother John is also an OM (1949).

RBR